Annals of Clinical Microbiology, The official Journal of the Korean Society of Clinical Microbiology

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Indexed in KCI, KoreaMed, Synapse, DOAJ
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pISSN 2288-0585 eISSN 2288-6850

Single Clone of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1-Producing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Patients

Original article

Annals of Clinical Microbiology (Ann Clin Microbiol) 2002 June Volume 5, Issue 1, pages 21-25.

Single Clone of Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1-Producing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Patients

Won keun Song, Chang Hee Oh*, Seung Joo Kim**, Tae Jae Lee, Min-Jeong Park, Dong Hoon Shin, Sung Ha Kang, and Kyu Man Lee

Departments of Clinical Pathology, Pediatrics*, and Infection Control Office**, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

Abstract

Background: Six babies infected with Staphylococcus aureus occurred in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) over a period of 2 months, which was successfully controlled with the aid of molecular typing of the isolates.

Methods: We examined the staphylococcal toxins, mecA and tst gene PCR, and repetitive-element PCR (rep-PCR) typing in S. aureus isolated from the clinical specimens of infected babies, nasal swabs of the patients and medical personnels in a NICU, and environmental equipments.

Results: Among all S. aureus isolates tested, they were toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1)producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) who have mecA and tst gene, and one identical repPCR pattern all, except 3 MRSA isolated from the nasal swabs of 2 non-infected patients and 1 medical personnel.

Conclusions: It was demonstrated that TSST-1 producing MRSA became epidemic in the NICU as a result of the spread of a single clone. (Korean J Clin Microbiol 2002;5(1):21-25)

Keywords

Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Neonatal intensive care unit, Repetitive-element PCR