Annals of Clinical Microbiology, The official Journal of the Korean Society of Clinical Microbiology

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Indexed in KCI, KoreaMed, Synapse, DOAJ
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pISSN 2288-0585 eISSN 2288-6850

Etiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacterial Pathogens Causing Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infection at a Tertiary-care Hospital

Original article

Annals of Clinical Microbiology (Ann Clin Microbiol) 2005 December Volume 8, Issue 2, pages 142-147


https://doi.org/10.5145/ACM.2005.08.2.142

Etiology and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bacterial Pathogens Causing Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infection at a Tertiary-care Hospital

Jeong Hwan Shin1,5, Hye Ran Kim1, Hi Ryune Lee1, Jae Il Chung2, Kweonsik Min2,5, Chi Sook Moon3, Seong Mi Ryu4, and Jeong Nyeo Lee1,5
Departments of Laboratory Medicine1, Urology2, and Internal Medicine3, College of Medicine, Paik Institute for Clinical Research5, Inje University, Infection Control Committee4, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan, Korea

Abstract

Background: Resistant organisms are now a growing and frequent problem in community-acquired infections. There is little information on the etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI) at a tertiary-care hospital.

Methods: We evaluated the distribution of etiological organisms with their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of CA-UTI in the patients visiting a tertiary-care hospital during the period of three years from 2001 through 2003.

Results: In total, 1,753 bacterial isolates yielded a significant growth as pathogens of CA-UTI in this study. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli(38.3%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa(10.8%), Enterococcus faecalis(7.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae(6.4%), coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) (5.4%) and Staphylococcus aureus(5.2%). The prevalence of E. coli was significantly higher in females (P< 0.001), whereas P. aeruginosa, E. faecalis,and S. aureus were significantly more common in male group (P< 0.001). The susceptibility rate of E. coli was 26.0% to ampicillin, 65.8% to gentamicin, 51.3% to co-trimoxazole, and 62.5% to ciprofloxacin. The susceptibility patterns of Enterobacteriaceae other than E. coli were different from those of E. coli. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase was detected in 7.9% of E. coli and 15.6% of K. pneumoniae.

Conclusion: This study demonstrates a diversity of etiological organisms and a high rate of resistance to commonly used antimicrobials of CA-UTI in patients visiting a tertiary-care hospital. (Korean J Clin Microbiol 2005;8(2):142-147)

Keywords

Community-acquired infection, Urinary tract infection, Etiology, Antibiotic resistance