Annals of Clinical Microbiology, The official Journal of the Korean Society of Clinical Microbiology

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pISSN 2288-0585 eISSN 2288-6850

Species Distribution and Susceptibilities to Azoles of Candida Species Including C. tropicalis in a Tertiary Burn Center

Original article

Annals of Clinical Microbiology (Ann Clin Microbiol) 2010 June, Volume 13, Issue 2, pages 79-84.

https://doi.org/10.5145/ACM.2010.13.2.79

Species Distribution and Susceptibilities to Azoles of Candida Species Including C. tropicalis in a Tertiary Burn Center

Tae-Hyoung Kim1, Yong Seong Lee2, Mi-Kyung Lee3, Kyu Man Lee4
Departments of 1Urology and 3Laboratory Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Departments of 2Urology and 4Laboratory Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea

Abstract

Background: Candida species are the fourth leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections and have one of the highest mortality rates among nosocomial pathogens. C. tropicalis has been reported to be one of the leading Candida species other than C. albicans to cause Candida infection in patients who have malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and burn. This study was designed to determine whether burn might influence the species distribution and susceptibilities of azoles against clinical isolates of Candida species including C. tropicalis

Methods: A total 372 Candida isolates from various samples in a tertiary burn center were studied, and the MICs of Candida isolates to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were tested by broth microdilution method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A2. A comparison was made between Candida isolates from burn patients and non-burn patients. 

Results: The percentages of C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata isolates from burn patients and non-burn patients were 42.3% and 64.2% (P=0.000), 35.7% and 21.6% (P=0.002), 11.9% and 7.8%, and 10.1% and 6.4%, respectively. Decreased susceptibilities to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were observed more frequently in burn patients (4.76%, 19.05%, and 0.60%, respectively) than non-burn patients (2.45%, 14.22%, and 0%, respectively). 

Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that burn may lead to influence the species distribution and susceptibilities to azoles of Candida species. (Korean J Clin Microbiol 2010;13:79-84)

Keywords

Candida species, Candida tropicalis, Burn, Azole, Antifungal susceptibility